Crucifixion was the ultimate humiliation the Roman Empire could inflict on its enemies. It was also an unambiguous sign that God must have forsaken the victim. The Crucified One could not possibly be the first fruits of the resurrection expected by Jews at the end of the ages. Yet, on the third day Christ was raised from the tomb. By pouring out new life upon Him, God endorsed Jesus’ vision: the way of mercy, reconciliation and closeness to the poor was indeed God’s way. And so Christ’s resurrection means new life here and now for the faithful, freedom through the waters of baptism from the horizon of death, and the copious spiritual nourishment of the Eucharist.

1. Christ in Limbo, 2014

Amanda Patterson

Acrylic

1 Peter 3:19. He was raised to life in the Spirit. So he went and preached to the spirits in prison. This painting portrays Christ’s dramatic assault on hell in the three days between the Crucifixion and the Resurrection, when he freed the souls on the just and led them out in triumph.

2. Angel, 2017

Bernard Allen

Mosaic

The angel of the Lord announced the Incarnation of the one who 'will save his people from their sins' (Mt1:21) and the resurrection 'He is not here; for he has risen as he said' (Mt 28.6).

3. The Lord from Hagia Sophia, 2016

Blazena Dzurjanikova

Semi-precious Stone Glass Mosaic

These works can bring to London a taste of the great works that have become a legacy to the whole humanity, not only the Christian community. Iconography helps us fix our eyes on the hidden reality that is seen only through the eyes of faith. The works can thus bring anew the phenomenon from the past into present; elements that have for centuries helped to sustain Christians.

4. Meeting Mary, 2016

Francis Hoyland

5. Noli Me Tangere, 2016

Francis Hoyland

6. Noli Me Tangere, 2014

James Lynch

Oil

In 'Noli Me Tangere', Mary Magdalen sees Christ outside the tomb and in falling to her knees in homage she shows that she recognises that Christ has risen, has fulfilled his prophecy and proved his deity.

7. The Resurrection, 2014

James Lynch

Oil

Two are objective - realistic - paintings showing the discovery of the empty tomb. In 'The Resurrection' painting, the three women have arrived at the tomb to find it empty.

8. Pentecost, 2013

James Lynch

Oil

The Pentecost can be described as Post Resurrection and depicts the fear and terror of the disciples in the upper room.

9. Noli Me Tangere, 2015

John Bateson

Pastel on Paper

Noli me tangere attempts to capture that moment when Jesus reveals his identity to Mary Magdalene following his resurrection. The people in the background of the picture remind us that this meeting has a universal significance.

10. Face of an Angel, 2017

John Bateson

Oil on Paper

The angel is entrusted with telling the two women who have come looking for Jesus the news that he is risen.

11. Restoration, 2017

Kirsty Kerr

Cloth, Thread

“And He who was seated on the throne said, ‘Behold, I am making all things new.’”
- Revelation 21:5a

This work takes inspiration from the Japanese practise of “kintsugi” - repairing broken pieces with gold. The materiality of the piece hints at the veil torn in two, the folded grave-clothes, and the scars still visible in Christ’s resurrected body.

12. Resurrection, 2017

Marcia Scott

Oil

My work is a dialogue with the historic movement of Abstract Expressionism and Colour Field Painting as I feel the expressive nature of its language is suited to convey memory and emotion free from rational and bodily limits. Through this abstract language, I feel I can express the uplifiting qualities of joy and celebration in an almost musical form. On hearing the theme of resurrection I had a a strong visual image evocative of multi-coloured wings soaring on a blue background which I would like to name 'Resurrection'.

13. Icon of the Couple at Emmaus who recognised Christ at the Breaking of Bread, 2017

Mike Quirke

Tempera on Board

(Dedicated to the memory of Fr Alan Fudge) The icon of Emmaus is presented as an appearance of Christ resurrected and glorious depicting the moment when Christ is recognised in the breaking of the bread. The two travellers have journeyed away from Jerusalem downhearted at the turn of events. They do not identify Christ in the mysterious stranger who joins them on the road. Walking along together he inteprets the recent events for them in the light of Scripture. Their hearts are stirred and they invite him to join them for a meal to continue their meeting. At the moment he takes up the bread in blessing they recognise him! Icons and representations portraying this event normally include two male travellers. Cleopas is named in the text and as the author of the gospel narrative St Luke is traditionally assumed to be the other. However, I have been impressed by the inspiration of Fr. Alan Fudge. He suggested the two might have been a couple, man and wife - why not? This is the idea represented here. The mystery of the presence of Christ at the heart of Christian marriage. The two have been despondent, overwhelmed by the difficulties manifest in the presence of the cross. He journeys with the couple catechising them in the presence of the cross and giving support through the word. They discover their hearts lifted and press him to join them further. They recognise his presence and receive his glorified life in the Eucharist. It is this life that sustains their union and gives them a spirit to 'evangelize' to share with others the Good News of the Resurrection.

14. Christ Descends into Hell (Anastasis), 2017

Mike Quirke

Oil and Mixed Media on Board

The third submission is intended as an example from the current group of Festal Icons on which I'm working - these are a work in progress hence I've submitted a thumbnail only. Here I have shown the 'Harrowing of Hell'. With this series of paintings I'm aiming for a more experimental approach to the typical formal look of icon painting. Here I'm exploring expressive brushwork and painterly effects - with an intention to engage with contemporary approaches.

15. Road to Emmaus, 2016

Paul Cyr

Gouache on Paper

These images are inspired by icons but executed with a modernist approach to convey 'that Christ has risen and is present throughout the generations.

16. The Meeting, 2017

Paul Cyr

Coloured Etching

These images are inspired by icons but executed with a modernist approach to convey 'that Christ has risen and is present throughout the generations.'

17. The Meeting 2, 2017

Paul Cyr

Coloured Etching

These images are inspired by icons but executed with a modernist approach to convey 'that Christ has risen and is present throughout the generations.'

18. Resurrection, 2017 (2 of 3)

Rachel Alem

Acrylic on Board

'My Lord and My God' the apparition of the Risen Lord to doubting Thomas, 'He Descended into Hell' - The Anastasis and 'Noli me Tangere' the apparition of the Risen Christ to Mary Magdalene

19. Resurrection, 2017 (3 of 3)

Rachel Alem

Acrylic on Board

'My Lord and My God' the apparition of the Risen Lord to doubting Thomas, 'He Descended into Hell' - The Anastasis and 'Noli me Tangere' the apparition of the Risen Christ to Mary Magdalene

20. Resurrection, 2017 (3 of 3)

Rachel Alem

Acrylic on Board

'My Lord and My God' the apparition of the Risen Lord to doubting Thomas, 'He Descended into Hell' - The Anastasis and 'Noli me Tangere' the apparition of the Risen Christ to Mary Magdalene.

21. Arise, 2017

Rene De Los Reyes

Watercolour

The glaring light of Resurrection brings the promise of life everlasting to those who believe. John 11:25-26 says, “I am the resurrection and the life. Those who believe in me, even though they die, will live, and everyone who lives and believes in me will never die. Do you believe this?”

22. Explosion of Joy, 2010

Ann Dunne

Embroidery

The intention of this work concerns the joy of the Trinity over the Birth, Life, Death and Resurrection of Christ. The Trinity is represented not only by the dove but by the many forms which present 'three'. The Cross is central. The joy in the heavens is reflected in the stars : the four-point Star of Bethlehem, symbol of Jesus' birth and the purpose for which he was born; the six point star, the Star of Creation; The eight point star, the Star of Redemption, which is place centrally around the Cross. I see it fitting in an exhibition on Resurrection by inviting us to share in the same joy in Christ's saving act for us.
Resurrection Exhibition